Jane Holland’s latest thriller is centred around a disturbing sibling relationship.

1. Tell us more about your latest book, Forget Her Name?

Catherine receives a rather horrible wedding present – a snow globe that used to belong to her long-dead sister Rachel, only with something gruesome inside it. Rachel was a nasty piece of work who made her childhood miserable, and Catherine cannot understand why anyone would send her such a thing. Unless Rachel herself sent it.

2. What inspired you to write this book?

There’s something particularly challenging about close family relationships when they go wrong, a topic that’s always fascinated me. This is just an extension of that fascination.

3. Did you do any specific research for the book?

Catherine works for an independently funded foodbank charity, and her husband Dominic works in a hospital, so both of those jobs had to be researched. There are also some crime scenes in the book which needed an expert consultation before I was satisfied that the police procedure was correct.

4. If you have to pick one favourite character from the book, who would it be and why?

I can’t answer this one as it might give away too much!

5. Can you describe Forget Her Name in 3 adjectives?

Chilling, baffling, complex.

6. What is your favourite and least favourite thing about writing?

My favourite thing about being a writer is not having to get up and go out to work every day. That’s a dream come true. My least favourite thing is sadness over unpleasant reviews. I don’t write in a vacuum and I love it when reviewers understand what I was trying to do in a book, or get in touch to say they enjoyed a book. Equally, I read all negative reviews and try to decide if I need to change anything about my writing. So really nasty comments can be difficult to deal with. A Goodreads reviewer once suggested I should be burnt at the stake!

7. Who is your favorite fictional hero or heroine?

Probably Jack Reacher. Though I worry about him not using toothpaste!

8. What’s one book you wish you had written?

I don’t have any I wish I’d written. I’m not that kind of person.

9. What’s one of the most exciting things that has happened to you since you became a writer?

The most exciting thing happened really early on, back in the mid-90s when I was just starting out as a poet. I managed to win a major Eric Gregory Award from the Society of Authors, which is for poets under thirty. Without that amazing stroke of luck, I don’t know if any of my early career would have happened.

10. What’s next for you?

I’m currently writing a thriller set on Dartmoor, which is near where I live in Devon. So watch this space!

 

Rachel’s dead and she’s never coming back. Or is she?

As she prepares for her wedding to Dominic, Catherine has never been happier or more excited about her future. But when she receives an anonymous package — a familiar snow globe with a very grisly addition — that happiness is abruptly threatened by secrets from her past.

Her older sister, Rachel, died on a skiing holiday as a child. But Rachel was no angel: she was vicious and highly disturbed, and she made Catherine’s life a misery. Catherine has spent years trying to forget her dead sister’s cruel tricks. Now someone has sent her Rachel’s snow globe — the first in a series of ominous messages…

While Catherine struggles to focus on her new life with Dominic, someone out there seems intent on tormenting her. But who? And why now? The only alternative is what she fears most.

Is Rachel still alive?


Jane Holland is a Gregory Award–winning poet and novelist who also writes commercial fiction under the pseudonyms Victoria Lamb, Elizabeth Moss, Beth Good and Hannah Coates. Her debut thriller, Girl Number One, hit #1 in the UK Kindle Store in December 2015. Jane lives with her husband and young family near the North Cornwall/Devon border. A homeschooler, her hobbies include photography and growing her own vegetables.

Facebook: @JaneHollandAuthor

 

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